California

The Trauma Resource Institute’s Headquarters are located in Claremont, California.  TRI has collaborated with many organizations within California, including the Department of Behavioral Health in San Bernardino County, Santa Barbara County, Southern California Counseling Center, Peace over Violence, Department of Veterans Affairs,  Center for Community Solutions, Loma Linda University, Claremont Graduate University, UCLA School of Social Work, Child Protective Services of many counties within California and Christian Counseling Services, Redlands, California.

TRI has worked with the County of San Bernardino since 2007 and is currently launching with the Department of Behavioral Health the Community Resiliency Model Project(CRMP) and has completed its third round of Trauma Resiliency Model Train the Trainer(TRMT) workshops. The CRMP has trained community members to be trainers.  The trainers are now continuing to bring CRM skills training to members of the community.    The TRMT has trained over 30 mental health professionals including psychologists, social workers and marriage family therapists as Certified TRM Trainers to train their clinical staff in the Trauma Resiliency Model.

San Bernardino County encouraged TRI to propose a project through the Mental Health Services Act based upon the work TRI has accomplished in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.  The project was focused upon groups identified as “at risk” because of not being able to access mental health services. The proposal was written, approved and the project completed at the end of 2013.  The results are as follows:

State of California, Mental Health Services Act (2013)

Community Resiliency Model Innovation Project

The Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) in San Bernardino County Community Resiliency Training (CRM) Innovation Project was initiated in December 2010 through the California Mental Health Services Act – Proposition 63 and completed December 2013. Implemented by DBH and the Trauma Resource Institute (TRI), the goal of the project was to bring biologically based trauma intervention training, the Community Resiliency Model Training, to seven marginalized groups in San Bernardino County who have limited financial and logistical access to mental health resources. The intent has been to expand local response capacity by offering training in CRM skills, designed to address the needs of community members needing mental health education and coping skills. These groups were chosen because they were likely experiencing the effects of the cumulative trauma that is associated with racism, homophobia, poverty and untreated posttraumatic stress from military service including combat.

All of the 109 participants among the six groups (Veterans, African-Americans, Asian-Pacific Islanders, GLBTQ, At-Risk Youth and Latinos) received group sessions of CRM, as well as individual sessions in either demonstrations or in work with a trainer under supervision.

  • 62% of the participants were female
  • 38% were male
  • the age of the participants ranged from 22-75 years with an average age of 51.

The participants reported an array of physical and emotional symptoms, reflecting the extensive impact on the mind body system when one is a member of a vulnerable group in a high poverty county. Participants reported an average of 6 physical distress symptoms and an average of 6 emotional distress symptoms.

In order to assess effectiveness of treatment, trainees were assessed immediately after the training was completed, and again 3-6 months later. Combined, the groups reported improvements in the distress indicators of depression, hostility, somatic, and anxiety.

  • 82% of the respondents indicated less depression

symptoms post training,

  • 59% less hostility symptoms,
  • 59% less somatic symptoms, and
  • 58% less anxiety symptoms.

A major finding of the research conducted suggests that the fact that such a large percentage of depression symptoms are improved across populations suggests that using the CRM skills, which stabilize the nervous system, and learning how to teach them to others, offers trainees a greater experience of control and empowerment, which can result in a sense of renewed hope.

In order to have a preliminary assessment of the stability of treatment effects, trainees’ symptoms were assessed 3-6 months after the training. Findings indicate that at the 3-6 month follow-up, pre to follow-up comparison analyses show positive trends in the desired direction of improvement in every distress and well-being indicator, with statistically significant improvement pre to follow-up decreases in anxiety, depression and hostility symptoms.

State of California, Mental Health Services Act (2013)

Veterans Extension Project

The Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) San Bernardino County Veteran Extension Project (VEP) took place from February-June 2012 in response to the request of the Department of Behavioral Health to extend community resiliency services initiated in the CRM project begun in 2010 to the larger veteran population in San Bernardino County.

Implemented collaboratively by DBH and the Trauma Resource Institute (TRI), the goal of the project was to bring biologically based trauma intervention training to a larger cohort of veterans in San Bernardino County who have limited financial and logistical access to mental health resources. The intent was to expand local response capacity by offering training in CRM skills, which are biologically based, designed to address the needs of community members needing mental health education and coping skills. The groups were chosen because they were likely experiencing the effects of the cumulative trauma that is associated with poverty, racism, and untreated posttraumatic stress from military service including combat.

There were 46 participants among the three groups who received group sessions of CRM skills, as well as individual sessions in either demonstrations or in work with a trainer under supervision.

  • 58% of the participants were female
  • 42% were male
  • the age of the participants range from 28-74 years, with an average age of 53.

The participants report an array of physical and emotional symptoms, reflecting the extensive impact of high stress on the mind body system when one is a veteran in a high poverty county. Participants reported an average of 6 emotional distress symptoms and 5 physical distress symptoms.

In order to assess effectiveness of treatment, trainees were assessed immediately after training was completed, and again 3-6 months later.   Results indicate that immediately after training the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) symptoms of distress improved at the level of significance in the areas of anxiety, depression and hostility. Combined, the three groups reported positive improvement in:

  • the distress indicators of anxiety (74% reporting less anxiety symptoms post training),
  • depression (69%),
  • somatic (52%) and
  • hostility (65%) distress indicators

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